Blog

  • Physiotherapist's Guide to Scoliosis

    Scoliosis is a condition that affects the normal shape of the spine, altering a person's overall trunk alignment and posture. Scoliosis causes the spine to move to the side and turn. This condition can occur at any time during the lifespan, but is more commonly detected during adolescence. Scoliosis affects 2% to 3% of the general population, and is more common in females than males. Scoliosis ranges from mild to severe cases, requiring a variety of treatments. The more severe cases may require surgery. Scoliosis is best managed with a team approach that includes the family, orthopedic physician or surgeon, orthotist, and Physiotherapist.

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  • Physiotherapist's Guide to Cervical Radiculopathy

    Cervical radiculopathy is often referred to as a pinched nerve in the neck. It is characterized by radiating pain from the neck to the shoulder, shoulder blade, arm, or hand. Weakness and lack of coordination in the arm and hand can also occur. The condition affects an average of 85 out of 100,000 people most often individuals in their 50s.

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  • Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Physiotherapy

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common condition of the wrist and hand that can affect the use of the whole arm. It is caused by pressure on the nerve at the base of the palm (median nerve). Because of the demands that people place on their hands and wrists, CTS is a common condition affecting 1 out of 20 Australians. Surgery for this condition is commonly performed on the wrist and hand.

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  • Golfers Elbow and Physiotherapy

    Medial epicondylitis (commonly called golfer's elbow or thrower's elbow) is a condition that develops when the tendons on the inside of the forearm become irritated, inflamed, and painful due to repetitive use of the hand, wrist, forearm and elbow. It is often diagnosed in people who perform repetitive motions, such as swinging a golf club or tennis racket, or activities requiring gripping, twisting, or throwing. Even using a computer or performing yard work can cause the condition. It is most common in men over the age of 35. A Physiotherapist can help decrease the pain caused by medial epicondylitis, and improve the affected elbow's motion, strength, and function.

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  • Tennis Elbow Lateral Epicondylitis and Physiotherapy

    Tennis elbow is a painful condition caused by overuse of the "extensor" muscles in your arm and forearm, particularly where the tendons attach to rounded projections of bone (epicondyles) on the outside or lateral aspect of the elbow. The muscles you use to grip, twist, and carry objects with your hand all attach to the "lateral epicondyle" at the elbow. That's why a movement of the wrist or hand can actually cause pain in the elbow.

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  • Physiotherapist's Guide to Elbow Fracture

    An elbow fracture is a bone break that occurs in the middle of the arm, in the area of the elbow joint. Its main cause is trauma, such as falling on the elbow, or falling on an outstretched hand. An elbow fracture can happen to anyone. Recent studies have identified a high number of fractures among children, women, and the elderly. Children have the highest rate of elbow fracture. Athletes also frequently experience elbow fractures.

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  • Shoulder dislocation and Physiotherapy

    Physiotherapist's Guide to Shoulder Dislocation: Treatment After Surgery Because the shoulder is the most mobile joint in the body and has such a wide range of motion, it is more likely to dislocate than any other joint in the body. Dislocations are among the most common traumatic injuries affecting the shoulder.

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  • Shoulder Rotator Cuff Tear and Physiotherapy

    The "rotator cuff" is a group of 4 muscles that are responsible for keeping the shoulder joint stable. Unfortunately, injuries to the rotator cuff are very common, either from injury or with repeated overuse of the shoulder. Injuries to the rotator cuff can vary as a person ages.

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  • Shoulder Proximal Humerus Fractures and Physiotherapy

    A proximal humerus fracture is a serious injury to the humerus bone in the shoulder joint that requires immediate treatment to preserve function of the shoulder. A fracture to the humerus bone is a possible consequence of a traumatic event, such as a fall or forceful collision. Depending on the specific location and type of fracture to the proximal humerus, surgical intervention may be required. Whether surgical or nonsurgical treatment is needed, physiotherapy treatment is essential to safely and effectively restore shoulder function, and return an individual to normal activity.

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  • Shoulder Frozen Shoulder and Physiotherapy

    Often called a stiff or "frozen shoulder", adhesive capsulitis occurs in about 2% to 5% of the general population. It affects women more than men and typically occurs in people who are over the age of 45. Of the people who have had adhesive capsulitis in one shoulder, 20% to 30% will get it in the other shoulder.

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